One of my first greeters in my new home in was a pair of doves. For the year that I lived in my apartment on the canyon they constantly visited me at my feeders on the porch, or at the front door as I came home, or outside the bushes of my office.

 
I thought they were wonderful. They were always together and always cooing. To me they were symbolic of my new relationship with my future husband, Del.

 
So of course I was overjoyed when I discovered the female dove was making a nest in one of my planters on our porch in the spring of that year. The only thing that worried me was that we were preparing a long trip as part of our new book on "Seeking Home", and I wasn't sure what would happen to them and their nest when we moved.

 
One day while I was in the office I heard a crash on my patio and when I went to investigate I found my lovely female dove lying on the porch and her companion on the ledge cooing frantically. He was trying to wake her up. I did too. I wrapped her up in something warm and waited for hours for her to revive. She didn't.

 
I was as heart broken as her friend. I couldn't understand why this had happened. He mourned for days and then one day he had a new companion. This made me even sadder as I could not understand why or how he could just – move on.

 
Del kept asking me what the dove had taught me. I would only shake my head and say, " I don't know." I was too involved in the grief of it and couldn't understand why it had affected me so deeply.

 
It was many months later before I understood the dove's lesson and gift to me.

 
I was sitting in our new – but temporary house – in another part of the United States with absolutely nothing familiar around me and I finally understood.

 
SHE had tried to stay – and it was important to go. There was a part of me that was holding on to not leaving what I had known for the majority of my life – symbolized by my lady dove building the nest.

 
The new lady knew that is was time to find a new home. She and her friend did not come back to my apartment to live. I only saw them the first day they were together as they perched in the tree and said "good by" to me.

 
This is all symbolic of course, as most lessons are. Once I let go of many things I thought I needed to be happy, I realized the love lesson my dove friend was teaching me. . It really wasn't that one dove died and another took her place. The idea of holding on had to die. The part of me that was holding on had to die so the person I really am – could fly.

 
So each day that I notice that I am still holding on to some of "how things used to be" I think of my friend the dove and thank her for the lesson about leaving, and I thank the new lady for choosing to go so she could continue her life with her companion and find her wings.

 
Beca (Lee) Lewis is the Author of Living in Grace: The Shift to Spiritual Perception

 


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